AnnieKO'Connor


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The Pandorica and the Regeneration of the Universe

This is Part 3. Read Part 1 and Part 2.

When the TARDIS  is destroyed in the crack in space-time, the crack itself is satisfied. But something else starts to happen. The universe is unmade. Stars vanish.  History is undone. Young Amelia Pond ceases existing.

But, as with the crucifixion, this is not where the story ends. The Doctor understands that the Pandorica has healing powers. Indeed, it perfectly preserved Amy for 2,000 years, and completely restored her life when Amelia gave it a living example of her DNA. The Pandorica opens. Amy emerges. It’s light falls upon a destroyed Dalek, bringing new life to it as well.

So the Doctor realizes if the Pandorica could shed it’s light on every moment of the whole universe, the entire universe would be regenerated. And so he takes it into the heart of the exploding TARDIS, which is exploding in precisely every time and location.

God on the cross did not require an outside element in order to restore the universe. Rather his death on the cross is not only what satisfies the crack in the universe, it is his ultimate creative power as God that likewise regenerates the universe at the same time.

And so the world is remade, the crack of sin satisfied, and the universe exists unbroken. Christ is not only the hope that sin is being vanquished at every moment, but that life and light is being poured into the world across every moment. It is the promise of the New Heaven and the New Earth that will be completely realized when the moment of the crucifixion ends.

The resurrection of Christ is the first act of the New Creation.

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The Exploding TARDIS and the Crucifixion

This is Part 2. Read Part 1 and Part 3.

Last week we talked about the near insatiability of the destructive nature of sin.

In Doctor Who, the Doctor discovered his TARDIS could satisfy the crack in all space and time. The TARDIS is devoured by the crack and explodes. Because the crack is everywhere all at once, the TARDIS explodes everywhere all at once. It was a one time event occurring at every time and at everyplace in the universe.

Exploding Tardis

But what of the real crack in space-time? What could satisfy sin? God’s answer is himself.

The crucifixion was a one time event occurring at every time and every place in the universe. We can still see it in suffering and in injustice. Wherever we see the crack of sin, we see Christ suffering within it. Though he was crucified 2,000 years ago, he is still being crucified.

There is still pain, horror, cruelty, destruction and injustice because the crucifixion is still happening. And when it is over, the crack will be satisfied. There will no longer be sin.

The universe in Doctor Who was adversely affected by the crack being satisfied. From the outsides into the origin of the explosion, the universe was erased. In fact, all of the universe had never existed once the crack was satisfied.

It is not enough simply to destroy sin and make the world as if it never existed; the world must be remade. But how? That’s what we’ll explore next week.


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Sin as the Crack in Space and Time

Imagine the universe is broken. Every where you go, in every time, there is this crack in the universe, breaking it further and further, breaking lives, breaking people, pulling loved ones from each other.

This doesn’t sound too far off, does it? There seems to be something—or many things—that make the world a dark, difficult place to live.

Tuesday I wrote about the universal Story written across the universe. The story I’ve mentioned there is present in season 5 of Doctor Who, and it is also the Story of Christ.

In Christianity, this brokenness is called sin. Sin exists in everywhere, in everything. No matter where you are in the world, you will see it.

Doctor Who tells the story of this crack. We start with it’s insatiability.

The story of sin in Christianity is the story of this insatiable, destructive force. Sacrificial laws in the Old Testament reveal this insatiability by requiring ongoing cycles of sacrifices. None of these sacrifices can quench sin. In the New Testament, Jesus offers himself as a sacrifice that can quench sin; he is able to do so since he is God, and this sacrifice is sufficient to close this crack in the universe and fulfill all the  Old Testament laws set to palliate it.

In Doctor Who, we see a similar pattern. The crack across Amy Pond’s bedroom wall is present on the crashed spaceship Byzantium. Several of the characters step into the crack and disappear; the crack devours them and their entire history. After they enter the crack, they were never born; the crack is hungry and destructive. If it is not satisfied, it will continue to pull apart the universe in this way.

In the same episode,  “Flesh and Stone,” we discover that only the most complex space-time event can satisfy the crack and close it. An army of weeping angels calculates that if the Doctor threw himself in, the crack would close. The Doctor, however, allows the gravity produced by the ship to drain, causing the planet’s gravity to pull the entire army of angels into the crack. Angels are complicated space-time events, and an army of them sates the crack: for now.

The angels in the crack are a palliative sacrifice; they are not able to satisfy the crack completely. It isn’t long before the crack returns, devours Rory, and the Doctor discovers what could satisfy the crack forever: his TARDIS.

Continue with Part 2 and Part 3 of this blog series.

DoctorTardis


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The Universal Story

In his book Miracles, C. S. Lewis discusses the ubiquity of a certain story, cropping up among the pages of history, in every location, in every religion. His view is that the story we keep telling is itself the Story of Christ.

All of history expected the Grand Miracle, and all of history since has echoed it. The story is that of descent and reascent. God descends to earth, descends into human form, descends into death, descends into Hell. He then reascends to Earth, to life, to human form, and to heaven. Lewis says, “In this descent and reascent everyone will recognise a familiar pattern: a thing written all over the world…Through this bottleneck, this belittlement, the highroad nearly always lies.” (Miracles 180).

Lewis continues to argue that this pattern is in nature, and “also in our emotional and moral life” because it is a reflection of God.

When I experience Story, I gladly delve into the universal elements of what each instance of Story has to offer. Lewis would say it is because God is universal—and I likely to say so as well—but others would say it is because Story itself is universal and the Christian Story is yet another instance of that, impartial to the existence or non-existence of a God. Both conclusions, however, are still shrouded in mystery.

So I proceed to experience Story and wonder at its universalness. From my subjective viewpoint, the default Story is that which Lewis claims, and that is the story to which I return again and again, no matter what tale I’ve set my sights upon.